Polly

Writings and Witterings

Mother of Pearl

63 Comments

This was one of my first entries to Poetics at dVerse with Brian Miller tending bar … it is also my very first entry to WeWritePoems, where we have been asked to write about unexpected descriptions ~ this poem fits the topic as the initial prompt was all about buttons, and the buttons I recalled were those fabulous mother of pearl ones that featured in many a button tin when I was a child …

mother of pearl caviar spoon

Smooth iridescence,
Shine of luminescence,
Smooth, smooth strength and resilience;
Touch tempting inlays
Traced by musicians,
Adored by pearly kings and queens.

Baglamas and bazoukis,
Caviar spoons, buttons,
Beautiful jewellery
Warm to the skin,
Silky and sexy, sultry and shimmering,
Nacreous clouds and notional things.

Polly Robinson © 2012

English: Greek baglamas

Advertisements

63 thoughts on “Mother of Pearl

  1. Ooh, such a beautiful last line, and what a creative place to take the prompt. Very nice. k.

    Like

  2. “Baglamas and bazoukis,
    Caviar spoons, buttons,”

    Love the sound of these lines!
    When I was a child I was fascinated by my Mum’s button tin – and the mother of pearl ones I thought were literally magic….

    Like

    • Isn’t it funny, the words we like … I really thought about whether ‘nacreous’ should be in this poem as I feel it a not terribly attractive word … however, with a little thought and some softening clouds it sits there quite well perhaps …

      Glad you like it k 🙂

      Like

    • Ah, nice of you to say so, Holly. We had button tins too and I loved the mother of pearl ones and those tiny rubber ones that no-one seemed to use – but you’re right MoP is magical 🙂

      Like

      • I was one of those dreamy children, always making up stories in my head about fairies and princesses… The mother of pearl ones were perfect for that.
        But there were some horrible big brown and green ones too that made me think of snails!

        Like

        • Hey! Don’t diss the snails … that’s where most of the MoP comes from …

          ‘Widely used for pearl buttons especially during the 1900s, were the shells of the great green turban snail Turbo marmoratus and the large top snail, Tectus niloticus’ part of the research for the poem (heh-heh)!

          Mind you, I think you refer to the horrible matt looking brown and green buttons that never seemed to move from the button jar / tin … they were there for ever as if no-one wanted them … they were doomed to life in a jar / tin and, yes, they were somehow reminiscent of the poor old snail …

          Did you have the little rubber buttons? I think they were the ones that came off the bodices children were made to wear (at least I was) – a sort of undergarment like a waistcoat that one wore over the top of the vest and below the blouse – fitted over the top of the navy blue school knickers with a pocket for your hanky … yikes, I’m showing my age!

          Like

  3. Gosh, you took me right back there with mention of the Pearly Kings and Queens. I miss them!
    Lovely prose 🙂

    Like

    • There are many, many websites about those pearly kings and queens, Bren, you could have a trip down memory lane perhaps, now I’ve reminded you about them! 🙂

      Glad you enjoyed my venture into buttondom.

      Like

  4. Some great language in this piece

    Like

  5. Nacreous is one of my favorite words, but it does inject a rather formal sort of tone–or maybe somber–either way, it doesn’t do so here in any bad way, and all the short phrasing works nicely to keep the imagery jumping. Enjoyed it.

    Like

    • Funny, the way we feel about different words – glad I used one that you really like – how interesting that you consider it formal – thank you so much for your nice comments – smiles

      Like

  6. Beautiful wordings, Polly.

    Like

  7. A lovely flow of words……

    Like

  8. Your diction is as iridescent as the mother of pearl, lovely!

    Like

  9. wow nice polly…love your use of language…like that last line..and like how you took the prompt and expanded it….love the stylings on instruments with it for sure….well done…

    Like

  10. Really charming; you’ve captured the beauty of the material, identifying its many uses in so much. Your words evoke its iridescent quality, allowing us to delight in its beauty as well.

    Like

    • I am glad it charmed you, Chazinator – and was astounded to find so many uses for the beautiful material – it is magical, a word Holly used for it earlier and so apt 🙂

      Like

  11. “Mother of Pearl”, exactly what poetry should sound like when read aloud…

    Like

  12. I like the mother of pearl jewelry and items…warm and milky to the skin ~ Enjoyed your share ~

    http://a-sweetlust.blogspot.ca/2012/06/koan-poems-sepia-sky-and-faded-lace.html

    Like

    • Yes, they are beautiful and I hoped everyone would identify that they do warm to body temperature, just like a diamond in fact!

      Thank you so much for your comments.

      Like

  13. Wow this is breathtakingly beautiful. and I sooo like the last two lines!

    Like

  14. Great write Polly! The mother of pearl is chic! To think these need nature to help but you gave a perfect treatment to enhance the value!

    Hank

    Like

    • Thanks for your comments Hank, Mother Nature is wonderful – I really liked your piece, too; very proper re etiquette and an interesting way to use Brian’s ace prompt 🙂

      Like

  15. very creative take on the prompt polly…pearl has its kind of magic for sure..

    Like

  16. Great start to my Sunday, with some of my favourite words, such as iridescence, baglamas, bazoukis (should that be bouzouki, though, if it’s the Greek instrument), sultry, nacreous. Rich and evocative.

    Like

    • Thank you for all your comments above, Marina, I am delighted that you visited – I’ve checked the Greek instrument … and it seems the plural of bazouki is bazoukis though there is some debate about baglamas / baglamades … (it’s all Greek to me!) I’ve left it as it is for now. Thanks for noticing, I’d much rather check these things out 🙂

      Like

  17. Definitely a different take on the prompt. Beautiful poem!

    Like

  18. Oh, this is magical – loved the flow to reading this.

    Like

  19. Love this poem and the sounds you use – they play well against the words bringing the sounds of guitars and balalaikas in a room of well coiffed and highly embellished gentry. Strung together with sibilance and assimilation. A very elegant poem – buttoned to the highest order.

    Like

  20. Quite the flow you used for your verse, very nicely done.

    Like

  21. Lovely word choices throughout, Polly!

    Like

  22. the contrasting textures make for great imagery

    3 radio button senryu

    Like

  23. This is the kind of poem I would read to Riley when she was 12 and tell her to write down words she didn’t know, then have her look them up. Built her vocabulary amazingly well. This is also a poem that adults and kids can enjoy! Thanks, Polly, sorry I’ve been absent but my post will explain:
    http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/07/03/snapshots-of-then-dverse-im-back/

    Like

    • Oh, poor you … those blue screens are pants! Glad to see you’ve probably fixed it.

      Thanks for the tip on MoP – maybe it could go down OK on Saturday, will think on this one 🙂

      Good to see you back Amy.

      Like

  24. What a dreamy poem. I especially liked the last line, that’s making me imagine more…

    Like

  25. What beautiful contrasts! It all feels so sumptuous and smooth! 🙂

    Like

  26. Lots and lots and lots of poetic images here! My head near spins (but then its late and I need sleep). Thank you for the response to WWP.

    Sorry for the delay in getting you posted this time, but now your comment is up to see. I left you a more detailed description in response to that poem link comment. Sorry but your comment got caught by two WP snags. So so sorry for the delay.

    neil

    Like

    • Thank you for your thoughts on ‘Mother of Pearl’ Neil ~ I was wondering what was happening when my post just wouldn’t appear on WWP and guessed it was something about being my first time of posting ~ you have some interesting prompts and I shall return.

      Thank you again for rescuing the situation 🙂

      Like

  27. Such a shimmery quality to your lines, Polly.

    Like

  28. Polly, I could not add to the accolades other than to say, that last line was the ultimate. I thought you had it all in there and then BAM! “Nacreous clouds and notional things. Just superb. Thanks, Polly! Thanks also for visiting my answer to the prompt and for all your kind words. Peace, Amy

    Like

    • It was good to find you on WWP and to see some of your work I might otherwise have missed Amy. Thanks for your thoughts on MoP, one of my preferred ‘darlings’ as it were 🙂

      Like

  29. Wonderful. I look forward to reading more of your work in the future.

    Like

Leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s