Polly

Writings and Witterings

Health and Cabaret

20 Comments

I’m trying another poetry form that I’ve never attempted before, this time a Villanelle. Here is some information about Villanelles:
A villanelle has only two rhyme sounds.
A villanelle is nineteen lines long, consisting of five tercets and one concluding quatrain.
The first and third lines of the first stanza are rhyming refrains that alternate as the third line in each successive stanza and form a couplet at the close.
Because of its non-linear structure, the villanelle resists narrative development.
Villanelles do not tell a story or establish a conversational tone.

Hmmm … I’d like to see what you think about this one …

Health and Cabaret

By Polly Robinson

Dip your head and laughing say
Hi to friend and bye to foe
Forever, ever and a day

Add to cheer in every way
The sun shines, the wind blows
Dip your head and laughing say

Welcome to our humble place
Here within the rosy throes
Forever, ever and a day

We will have wine, meat on trays
And welcome, whatever flows
Dip your head and laughing say

Welcome one and welcome all
Come drink, eat your daily fill
Forever, ever and a day

There is health and cabaret
In our place; they come here still
Dip your head and laughing say
Forever, ever and a day

Polly Robinson Β© 2012

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20 thoughts on “Health and Cabaret

  1. You’re brave attempting this…! Well done!
    I still want to do a “vaginelle”, as here… http://www.thevaginellas.blogspot.co.uk/ πŸ™‚
    As you know, I’m not big on forms (I’m too lazy) but I was made to do haiku in the week for the first time… am thinking I may do a little linked series of them if I can make them work – and that’s a big if!
    So I always admire your curiosity to work with all these different forms – you rise to the challenge!

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    • Thanks Holly, I’m never quite sure of the results, though … they never feel quite ‘me’, I guess [may not be expressing myself too well here, but hope you might know what I mean]. Perhaps this is why ‘blank verse’ or ‘free verse’ is so much more popular these days, though there are constraints in those … quite puzzling really …

      And the vaginellas – are simply extraordinary – recommend them to everyone reading this post!

      Hope we get to see your Haiku soon! πŸ™‚

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      • Must look up Haiku properly as I believe they’re supposed to go in sets of a certain number to create a fuller picture – kinda the sum of its parts or summat.
        I do understand what you mean about, um, meanings, but I believe using form is a good way of learning – to know the rules in order to break them to better effect. It can actually I think make a person’s free verse a lot better because of understanding the mechanics. So, in saying that, I really should try to do more… πŸ˜‰

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        • heh-heh … loving the sentiment … I thought Haiku was three lines: seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven, and five. Do not complicate it – that’s what it is!! heh-heh πŸ˜€

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  2. This turned out great, Polly. I find forms challenging and rewarding.

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    • Thanks Laurie, I do try them, but, as above, am never sure about the results … they certainly are challenging. I think I try them because I want to know as much about poetry and all its forms as I can … Rewarding? Yes, for sure, there is some satisfaction in seeing that you have met the requirements for a form. Some forms are fab, I’ve loved triolets and triversen for example.

      Many thanks for your comments πŸ™‚

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  3. you can almost clap in rhythm to this type of poetry – nicely done

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  4. I’ve always been a big fan of this form. Great job πŸ™‚

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  5. Well done for attempting that – it has a nice rhythm to it. I used to love villanelles and tried many myself as a teenager (not at all successfully). And isn’t Dylan Thomas’s ‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night’ one of the best examples of that?

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    • Yes, Dylan Thomas’s ‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night’ is a fine example, I particularly like ‘Mad Girl’s Love Song’ by Sylvia Plath, a wonderful Villanelle. Have another go at one, Marina!

      Thanks for your thoughts πŸ™‚

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  6. Polly, this was your first attempt? Really lovely. This made me smile from stem to stern, made me want to call you up and pop over for tea. I know of the form; however, I’m almost strictly free poetry… easier to rant when one doesn’t need to count the syllables! Or am I just lazy? It’s entirely possible. Good on you for creating a villanelle that doesn’t sound in any way forced or “counted.” And the Vaginellas are fab! Amy

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    • You can come to tea any time Amy πŸ™‚ I love that you think it doesn’t sound ‘forced’ – glad you like the Vaginellas – some of them read my blog, they’ll be delighted πŸ˜€

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  7. Speaking of vaginas, try this YouTube link. It’s going viral, and she’s a friend of my housemate!

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  8. I get very intimidated by form, but I have found that when I’ve attempted it even though it doesn’t turn out as it should it tends to make me think about making the poem work better. Well done, I think this turned out really well I enjoyed it πŸ™‚

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    • Thank you Cherry, you’re right, form is intimidating … yet perhaps that’s one of its attractions, perversely … complex stuff πŸ™‚

      Glad you think this one turned out OK πŸ™‚

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  9. Cheers for all times…

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  10. SlΓ‘inte Lindy πŸ™‚

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