Polly

Writings and Witterings

Night Walk

46 Comments

In the depths of night the sky is sulky
Walkers set out for the brow of the hill.
Around British Camp and down, down Shire Ditch,
Where ill-willed faeries live love fly and dance.
They avoid Waum’s Cave for fear of the witch,
Who lives alone, low deep down in the dell.

A crossroads appears, with pointing way stones,
To north, to south, direct the unwary.British Camp at night
No-one can vouchsafe their accuracy,
No-one knows it will pay to be chary.
The  ill-willed fae move the markers so the
Wenders’ and  walkers’ strong boots go astray.

The witch steps on twigs and rattles old leaves
And the sky darkens more, charcoals to grey,
Turns to pitch black and torch batt’ries are flat,
The walkers now feeling, stealing their way
Over hillocks and humps, bracken and bumps,
In the depths of the night at the end of the day.

Polly Robinson © 2013

I’m linking this poem to dVerse Poets OpenLinkNight. Please join us.

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46 thoughts on “Night Walk

  1. This is so vivid. I love it when you write about the fae.

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  2. A very enjoyable story. I like the tales of mystery and the unknown. Thank you.

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  3. You can never trust the fae. They’re always trying to deceive!

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  4. Very clever – I have been on some night walks – a bit hairy! k

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  5. I like this a lot Polly; particularly your use of local Lore.

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  6. nice…love what you do with the rhymes …The witch steps on twigs and rattles old leaves…enjoying the sounds and feel on the tongue when read out loud…nice…and yeah..the fairies…sigh…smiles

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    • I think poetry has to be read aloud to be meaningful … unless it’s a poem that really needs only one audience …

      Thanks for your thoughts, Claudia 🙂

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  7. i rather like night walks…there is an element that is def not there during hte day and our senses are heightened to all going on around us…unfortunately so is our imagination as well…smiles…def a nice sound within your own words tonight….

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    • One night, many years ago, a young mum and her boys scrambled up the side of The Beacon to see the Queen’s Jubilee bonfire ~ it was spooky, frightening, the young mum was scared but couldn’t show the boys … yes, Brian, senses and imagination are heightened …

      Good to see you like the sound of my words tonight 🙂

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  8. You set the scene quite well with the ominous tone.

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  9. I enjoyed this, Polly. I remember mistiming things on a mountain in Snowdonia once and having to come down in the dark – so scary! Thir poem evokes that feeling. But ‘my’ fear was more physical – a broken ankle, where on earth was I putting my foot?, the sound of rushing water close by and not able to see it – and definitely not fairies/fae. Interesting.

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  10. I particularly like the “sulky” sky in this one Polly. It’s a wonderful description and I knew at once exactly what you meant.

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  11. I too love the sounds when reading aloud…

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  12. Love the names of the places…Shire Ditch, cool… and the magic of witches and faeries. A totally entertaining write, Polly. I can almost see them outside now under the light of the moon…

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    • The Malvern Hills are wonderful to write about, Gayle. Shire Ditch inspired Tokien, he uses the name in The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings ~ cool ‘eh?

      Nice to see you so enjoyed it ~ lovely that you can see them all 🙂

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  13. Polly, there was so much to “see” in this poem. The night brings a heightening of other senses. Didn’t know about the Tolkien history, which makes it all the better. I swear I could see it all and hear it in my mind. BRAVA! Amy

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    • There is def something creepy about walking the wilds at night … makes the mind boggle.

      Cool that you could see and hear it in your mind ~ thanks for comments Amy 🙂

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  14. I loved the magical/ mystical feeling of your poem. You wrote the scene so well it (almost) seemed real!

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  15. You are a fantastic story teller, Polly — I am wrapped into the place with you. The woods of northwest Us where I haunt feels young when I read this. Not as many faeries and I have not yet seen a dragon here.

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  16. Reblogged this on poetry, photos and musings oh my! and commented:
    Magic is in the air!

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  17. I loved, loved, loved it! It has been forwarded to a who walks with the faeries and of course I re-blogged it. Hope you don’t mind? 🙂

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  18. Nicely rhymed and a wonderful touch with faeries, fae, and wenders.

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    • There’s a whole world of fae here at Hillcrest (our home) Jamie, and The Malverns are but eight miles away. I was brought up in Malvern. My mother took us walking on them frequently and told tales of Giant’s (Waum’s) Cave. It was later that I started to learn more about their history, but to me, never mind the facts let’s go for the fae 🙂

      Thank you for your comments, the Old English words are faves 🙂

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  19. Ha! I thought you were a gal after me own heart! You find out a little and want to know more ~ the internet is a wonderful research tool for peeps like us 🙂

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