Polly

Writings and Witterings

The Bruised and Quiet Wardrobe

42 Comments

Over at dVerse Poets Pub, MarinaSofia is urging fellow poets to let go of abstract concepts and describe things as concretely as possible in a poem combining household objects and adjectives describing emotions or feelings.

The Bruised and Quiet Wardrobe

She comes in the morning,
gives me no warning,
flings my doors forward,
flicks through my frocks.
I’m black and blue
by the time
she has finished
grabbing at garments,
cussing my locks.
I stand here, static,
utterly frozen,
quite unable to rage or rant.
Soon she’s beaming,
happy she’s chosen,
at long last, a woven shirt
brief and scant.
I’ll sit here, static,
’til she needs me again,
looks in my mirror
head cocked and then
gets out a hundred
different outfits,
bed and floor strewn
’til the room is shrouded
with dresses and dirndl skirts,
trousers and blouses.
I’m bruised but quiet,
I am black,
I am blue,
but I’m good,
I am wood
and I know what I do.

Polly Stretton Β© 2014

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42 thoughts on “The Bruised and Quiet Wardrobe

  1. Very clever take on the ways we in which we abuse our wardrobes… and a slightly sly twist at the end…

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  2. Hi Polly – I read this eagerly, searching for clues – right to the delightful end

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  3. haha… if wardrobes could talk… cool on having a dirnd… i once almost bought one but… smiles

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  4. That was great fun — well done !!

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  5. I feel that the wardrobe understands the curse of vanity more than anyone else.. sooner or later the wardrobe will see a progression towards less intensity…

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  6. This was fun, Polly! I enjoyed the perspective and the scene you drew.

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  7. If only a wardrobe could speak, I am sure it would have a lot to say. Smiles. Sometimes it must get tired of holding onto all those clothes. Smiles.

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  8. This is brilliant Polly!! I love all of it! So clever and you rose to the challenge perfectly! I love the head cocked to one side, I can totally picture the character. And those dirndl skirts! Id forgotten all about that word. Ive never thought about what on earth it means. I know what they are but the meaning? I feel more googling coming on! 😊 x

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    • I am pleased you enjoyed it, I enjoyed writing it πŸ™‚ Dirndl skirts are pretty horrid in my view, the ultimate in boring – but I guess some people like them πŸ™‚

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  9. I really enjoyed the fact that you wrote this from the point of view of the wardrobe. Clever and fun.

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  10. Thanks Victoria, it spoke to me! πŸ˜‰

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  11. I like the voice of the wardrobe Polly ~ I thought initially it was the woman but the ending told me otherwise ~ Well, we can surely make a woman happy with all the choices ~

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  12. I’m guessing this wardrobe would behave quite differently from the one in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast if it was animated.

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  13. Slammed the door of my wardrobe once (long ago) with such force it came off its hinges. Rather the wardrobe than me, or was it me?

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  14. What fun Polly! However, should my wardrobe talk, I would have to silence it! There are secrets in most collections! From your drindle skirt to … πŸ˜‰ xx

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  15. Ha! Unmentionables, ‘eh? πŸ˜‰

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  16. Nice. I never considered how my wardrobe gets a bit of abuse from me. I’ll be more considerate in the future.

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  17. Very clever Polly and hugely entertaining from this reader’s point of view. Speaking of point of view – commendable! Great work.

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  18. Brilliant take πŸ™‚

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  19. OH dear–you need a wintry forest to escape to! Thanks, Polly! k.

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  20. Polly, you are at the top of your game with this one. Captures the frustration of every woman trying to figure out what the heck to wear… and does it through the solid, sedentary closet’s thoughts. What a brill concept! Great fun. Amy

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  21. Gosh Polly, this works on so many levels in a metaphorical sense for me anyway… the tone of voice is so quietly resilient… I love the strength despite the pain. Great poem Polly! πŸ™‚

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  22. clever and well written!

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